Amid social and environmental conditions that are constantly changing, anthropology offers new critical perspectives on the world by highlighting how local and global issues are interconnected. Ethnography, the discipline’s field research method, makes it possible to document in real time a host of complex phenomena pertaining to diverse topics such as medicine, the environment, minorities, the media and indigenousness. Anthropology students have the opportunity to gain first-hand experience, observing and understanding contemporary issues through field research taking place around the world.

The School of Sociological and Anthropological Studies offers a Master of Arts in anthropology program. This MA in anthropology is offered as a full-time and a part-time program, in French and in English. In English, the maximum number of annual admissions is fixed according to the procedure explained in the Admission Requirements section.

Two options are available for the master's program: the MA with thesis and the MA with research paper. Admissible students may submit a request to add the co-op option to their program.

The program is governed by the general regulations in effect for graduate studies.

Learn more on application deadlines, language requirements and more by visiting the specific requirements webpage.

Students who have a BA with honours or major in anthropology with a minimum average of 70% (B), calculated in accordance with graduate studies guidelines, may be admitted to the MA program.

Students who have an honours BA with a minimum average of 70% (B) in another discipline, calculated in accordance with graduate studies guidelines, may be accepted into a qualifying program, requiring them to complete a maximum of eight courses.

All students must be able to read and understand texts in French and in English. Students must indicate, in their application, the language in which they plan to take the majority of their courses. The School reserves the right to require a language test for either language. 

The maximum number of students admitted annually in the MA in anthropology in English is limited to the average of admissions to the French version in the previous three years. The maximum number of admissions for the current year is available from the secretariat of the School of Anthropological and Sociological Studies.

MA with Thesis

Compulsory Courses:
ANT 5100Comparative Theoretical Approaches in Anthropology: the French and Anglo-American Traditions3 Units
ANT 5141Research Methodology in Anthropology3 Units
ANT 6150Research Proposal in Anthropology3 Units
6 elective course units in anthropology (ANT) at the graduate level 16 Units
Research Project:
ANT 7990Research Project0 Unit
Thesis:
ANT 7999Master's Thesis 20 Unit

Note(s)

1

One three-unit graduate course from another program may be included as an elective in the master’s program with thesis, subject to the approval of the coordinator of graduate studies in anthropology, and following consultation with the department responsible for the course.

2

Candidates must begin the process of selecting a thesis topic and a supervisor at the beginning of their program. The supervisor must be a member of the School of Sociological and Anthropological Studies.

MA with Research Paper

Compulsory Courses:
ANT 5100Comparative Theoretical Approaches in Anthropology: the French and Anglo-American Traditions3 Units
ANT 5141Research Methodology in Anthropology3 Units
ANT 6150Research Proposal in Anthropology3 Units
12 elective course units in anthropology (ANT) at the graduate level 112 Units
Research Project:
ANT 7990Research Project0 Unit
Research Paper:
ANT 7998Research Paper0 Unit

Note(s)

1

Up to two graduate courses (6 units) from another program may count as coursework for the master's program with research paper, subject to the approval of the coordinator of graduate studies in anthropology, and following consultation with the department responsible for the course concerned.

Co-op Option

The MA in Anthropology, in collaboration with the University of Ottawa’s Co-op office, offers a co-op stream to a limited number of students. The co-op option gives selected students the opportunity to acquire practical work experience by completing two one-session (four months), work placements. 

The option for the co-op stream is as follows. The first co-op placement will be in the summer of the first year and the second work placement will take place in the fall of the second year. Each work term is graded P (Pass) / F (Fail), based on the employer’s report and on a written report completed by the student. The student’s report must be 15 to 20 pages, including appendices. A Regular Professor from the Department will evaluate the student reports. 

The units awarded for co-op terms may not be used to obtain equivalences for other courses. In other words, the co-op units are additional to the minimum requirements of the degree. 

 To remain enrolled in the co-op program, a student must: 

  • maintain full-time status;
  • maintain a 7.0 grade point average; and
  • obtain a passing grade for each co-op work term.

Duration of Program

Full-time students are expected to fulfill all requirements of the thesis option within two years, and the research paper option within sixteen months. The maximum time permitted to complete the program is four years from the date of initial enrollment in the program.

Residence

Students admitted full-time must enroll full-time for at least three terms.

Minimum Standards

The passing grade in all courses is C+. Students who fail two courses (equivalent to 6 units) or the research proposal, or whose research progress is deemed unsatisfactory will be withdrawn from the program.

Research Fields & Facilities

Located in the heart of Canada’s capital, a few steps away from Parliament Hill, the University of Ottawa is among Canada’s top 10 research universities.

uOttawa focuses research strengths and efforts in four Strategic Areas of Development in Research (SADRs):

  • Canada and the World
  • Health
  • e-Society
  • Molecular and Environmental Sciences

With cutting-edge research, our graduate students, researchers and educators strongly influence national and international priorities.

Research at the Faculty of Social Sciences

The Faculty of Social Sciences represents a place of excellence in knowledge creation, research and training. Driven by both disciplinary and interdisciplinary perspectives, research at the Faculty is rich, innovative and varied, contributing to the depth of understanding and breadth of discussions on a variety of issues nationally and internationally.  This research, whether it be fundamental, theoretical, applied or action-oriented, is generated by our renowned expertise, ultimately culminating in applications designed to influence individual communities and the betterment of society.

We have identified five research themes which collectively represent a large proportion of the research undertaken at the Faculty of Social Sciences:

  • International Studies
  • Francophonie
  • Public Policy
  • Health, Well-Being
  • Justice, Society

Facilities, Research Centres and Institutes at the Faculty of Social Sciences

Centre for Interdisciplinary Research on Citizenship and Minorities (CIRCEM), Centre for International Policy Studies (CIPS), Centre for Public Management and Policy, Centre for Research on Educational and Community Service (CRECS), Centre on Governance (COG), Human Rights Research and Education Centre (affiliation), Institute of Feminist and Gender Studies and Institute for Science, Society and Policy.

For more information, refer to the list of faculty members and their research fields on Uniweb

IMPORTANT: Candidates and students looking for professors to supervise their thesis or research project can also consult the website of the faculty or department of their program of choice. Uniweb does not list all professors authorized to supervise research projects at the University of Ottawa.

Not all of the courses listed are given each year. The course is offered in the language in which it is described.

ANT 5100 Comparative Theoretical Approaches in Anthropology: the French and Anglo-American Traditions (3 units)

In-depth and comparative examination of the main theoretical currents in social and cultural anthropology in the French and Anglo-American traditions. The course will also focus on the development and the points of convergence and divergence of these currents throughout the history of anthropological thought as well as on their relative influence on anthropology in Francophone and Anglophone Canada.

Course Component: Seminar

ANT 5141 Research Methodology in Anthropology (3 units)

Methodological approaches specific to anthropology: ethnographic fieldwork methods; validation problems; content analysis; relationship between research questions, methods, theoretical framework, and results. Debates about the analysis of anthropological data collected in traditional and modern societies in the West and elsewhere; the qualitative-quantitative continuum; objectivity, involvement of the researcher and reflexivity; research ethics and responsibilities of the researcher.

Course Component: Seminar

ANT 5500 Approches théoriques comparées en anthropologie : Les traditions françaises et anglo-américaines (3 crédits)

Examen approfondi et comparé des principaux courants théoriques en anthropologie sociale et culturelle dans les traditions françaises et anglo-américaines. Le développement de ces courants et leurs points de convergence et de divergence tout au long de l'histoire de la pensée anthropologique ainsi que leur résonance au sein de l'anthropologie au Canada francophone et anglophone seront aussi examinés.

Volet : Séminaire

ANT 5541 Méthodologie de la recherche en anthropologie (3 crédits)

Approches méthodologiques propres à l'anthropologie : méthodes de terrain ethnographique; problèmes de validation; analyse de contenu; rapport entre problématiques, méthodes, cadre théorique et résultats. Débats sur l'analyse de données anthropologiques collectées dans les sociétés traditionnelles et modernes, ici comme ailleurs; continuum qualitatif-quantitatif; objectivité, implication du chercheur et réflexivité; éthique de la recherche et responsabilités du chercheur.

Volet : Séminaire

ANT 6101 Selected Topics in Political Anthropology and Socio-Cultural Change (3 units)

In-depth analysis of selected questions in the field of political anthropology and socio-cultural change (relating, for example, to indigenous peoples, immigration, cultural diversity, globalization, minority-majority relations, citizenship, gender relations, governance, security, human rights, environmental management, health, knowledge, and technology).

Course Component: Seminar

ANT 6102 Social and Cultural Anthropology: Fundamental Issues (3 units)

In-depth analysis of fundamental issues touching on one or more of the broad domains of social and cultural anthropology with the exception of political anthropology.

Course Component: Seminar

ANT 6103 The ''Culture'' Question in Anthropology (3 units)

Historical and critical in-depth analysis of the contributions and limitations of the notion of 'culture' in anthropology revolving around major issues in the discipline: identity transformations; decolonization; socio-economic upheavals and migration; global dynamics and problems of pluralism; multiculturalism and interculturalism.

Course Component: Lecture

ANT 6112 Selected Topics in Contemporary Anthropology I (3 units)

In-depth examination of a question or topic linked to new trends or research areas in social and cultural anthropology.

Course Component: Lecture

ANT 6122 Selected Topics in Contemporary Anthropology II (3 units)

In-depth examination of a question or topic linked to new trends or research areas in social and cultural anthropology.

Course Component: Lecture

ANT 6150 Research Proposal in Anthropology (3 units)

In-depth reflection on how to conceptualize and shape a research proposal, providing students with the tools required to design a research project and to discuss each stage of the project as a group.

Course Component: Seminar

Prerequisites: ANT 5141, ANT 5100

ANT 6501 Thèmes choisis en anthropologie politique et changements socioculturels (3 crédits)

Analyse approfondie de questions ciblées dans le champ particulier de l'anthropologie politique et des changements socioculturels (notamment, les questions relatives aux autochtones, à l'immigration, à la diversité culturelle, à la mondialisation, aux relations minorités/majorité, à la citoyenneté, aux rapports de sexe, à la gouvernance, à la sécurité, aux droits humains, à la gestion de l'environnement, à la santé, aux savoirs et aux technologies).

Volet : Séminaire

ANT 6502 Anthropologie sociale et culturelle : Enjeux fondamentaux (3 crédits)

Analyse approfondie d'enjeux fondamentaux s'inscrivant dans un ou plusieurs des grands domaines de l'anthropologie sociale et culturelle, en dehors de l'anthropologie politique.

Volet : Séminaire

ANT 6503 Questions autour de la notion de «culture» en anthropologie (3 crédits)

Analyse historique et critique approfondie des apports et limites de la notion de « culture » en anthropologie autour de laquelle se concentrent les enjeux majeurs de la discipline : transformations identitaires, (dé)colonisation, bouleversements socio-économiques et migrations, dynamiques mondiales et problématiques du pluralisme, du multiculturalisme et de l'interculturalisme.

Volet : Cours magistral

ANT 6512 Thèmes choisis en anthropologie contemporaine I (3 crédits)

Analyse approfondie d'une problématique ou d'une question liée aux nouvelles tendances en recherche ou aux nouveaux thèmes de recherche en anthropologie sociale et culturelle.

Volet : Cours magistral

ANT 6522 Thèmes choisis en anthropologie contemporaine II (3 crédits)

Analyse approfondie d'une problématique ou d'une question liée aux nouvelles tendances en recherche ou aux nouveaux thèmes de recherche en anthropologie sociale et culturelle.

Volet : Cours magistral

ANT 6550 Problématique de recherche en anthropologie (3 crédits)

Réflexion approfondie sur la conception et la mise en forme d'une problématique de recherche afin de permettre aux étudiant-es de concevoir un projet de recherche et de discuter (collectivement) de chaque étape.

Volet : Séminaire

Préalables : ANT 5541 et ANT 5500.

ANT 6932 Lectures dirigées en anthropologie / Directed Readings in Anthropology (3 crédits / 3 units)

Cours individuel ayant pour objectif d'approfondir les connaissances de l'étudiant dans un domaine particulier ou de lui permettre de se familiariser avec un nouveau domaine. / Individual course aimed at deepening a student's knowledge of a particular area or at gaining knowledge of a new area.

Volet / Course Component: Cours magistral / Lecture

Prerequisite: Individual course aimed at deepening a student?s knowledge of a particular area or at gaining knowledge of a new area. The topic is selected and developed in consultation with departmental guidelines.

ANT 7990 Projet de recherche / Research Project

Projet individuel. / Individual Project.

Volet / Course Component: Recherche / Research

ANT 7998 Mémoire / Research Paper

Volet / Course Component: Recherche / Research

ANT 7999 Thèse de maîtrise / Master's Thesis

Volet / Course Component: Recherche / Research