Summary

  • Degree offered: Master of Science (MSc)
  • Registration status options: Full-time; Part-time
  • Language of instruction: English

Most of the requirements of this program must be fulfilled in English. Research activities may be conducted in English or in French, or in both languages, depending on the main language of the professor and of the members of the research group.

  • Primary program: MSc in Physics
  • Collaborative specialization: Science, Society and Policy
  • Program options (expected duration of the program):
    • with thesis, standard stream (6 full-time terms; 24 consecutive months)
    • with thesis, accelerated stream (3 full-time terms; 12 consecutive months)
  • Academic units: Faculty of Science, Department of Physics, Ottawa-Carleton Institute for Physics.

Program Description

Ottawa-Carleton Institute for Physics

Established in 1983, the Ottawa-Carleton Institute for Physics (OCIP) combines the research strengths of the University of Ottawa and Carleton University. The Institute offers graduate programs leading to the master’s (MSc) and doctoral (PhD) degrees in Physics.

Research facilities are shared between the two campuses. Students have access to the professors, courses and facilities at both universities; however, they must enroll at the “home university” of the thesis supervisor.

Main Areas of Research

  • Condensed matter
  • High energy physics
  • Biological physics
  • Medical physics
  • Photonics

Other Programs Offered Within the Same Discipline or in a Related Area

  • Master of Science Physics (MSc)
  • Doctorate in Philosophy Physics (PhD)

Fees and Funding

  • Program fees:

The estimated amount for university fees associated with this program are available under the section Finance your studies.

International students enrolled in a French-language program of study may be eligible for a differential tuition fee exemption.

Notes

  • Programs are governed by the general regulations in effect for graduate studies.
  • In accordance with the University of Ottawa regulation, students have the right to complete their assignments, examinations, research papers, and theses in French or in English.

Program Contact Information

Graduate Studies Office, Faculty of Science

30 Marie-Curie Street, Room 181

Ottawa, Ontario, Canada

K1N 6N5
 

Tel.: 613-562-5800 ext. 3145

Email: gradsci@uOttawa.ca
 

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For the most accurate and up to date information on application deadlines, language tests and other admission requirements, please visit the specific requirements webpage.

To be eligible for the standard stream of the MSc, candidates must:

  • Be the holder of a bachelor’s degree with a specialization, or a major in physics (or equivalent) with a minimum average of 70% (B).

Note: International candidates must check the admission equivalencies for the diploma they received in their country of origin.

  • Demonstrate a good academic performance as shown by official transcripts, research reports, abstracts or any other documents demonstrating research skills.
  • Pay the $100 ($CDN non-refundable) application fee.
  • Meet the funding requirements.

Note: International students must provide proof of financial support: i.e., a stipend provided by a supervisor as well as a combination of awards and/or trust funds.

  • Identify at least one professor who is willing to supervise your research and thesis (thesis option only).
    • We recommend that you contact potential thesis supervisors as soon as possible.
    • To register, you need to have been accepted by a thesis supervisor.
    • The supervisor’s name is required at the time of application.

To be eligible for the accelerated stream of the MSc, candidates must:

  • Have an admission average of 8.0.

Note: International candidates must check the admission equivalencies for the diploma they received in their country of origin.

  • Have completed, with a grade of at least A-, a 4000- or 5000-level course in physics (PHY) that can be counted towards the MSc.
  • Have a thesis supervisor who has agreed to continue directing the candidate’s research at the MSc level.

Note: The choice of supervisor will determine the student’s primary campus location. It will also determine which university awards the degree.

  • Pay the $100 ($CDN non-refundable) application fee.

Language Requirements

Applicants must have a good knowledge of either English or French and a good ability to write in English.

Applicants whose first language is neither French nor English must provide proof of proficiency in the language of instruction.

Language tests recognized by the University of Ottawa:

  • TOEFL: 550 (paper-based); 79-80 (internet-based); or
  • IELTS: Overall 6.5 – Individual 5.0 (paper-based or internet-based); or
  • An equivalent language test.

Note: Candidates are responsible for any fees associated with the language tests.

Notes

  • Candidates must apply to the primary program and indicate in their application for admission to the MSc in Physics that they wish to be accepted into the collaborative specialization in Science, Society and Policy.
  • The admission requirements listed above are minimum requirements and do not guarantee admission to the program.
  • Admissions are governed by the general regulations in effect for graduate studies.

Documents Required for Admission

In addition to the documents required for graduate and postdoctoral studies, candidates must submit the following documents:

  • A resume
  • A letter of intent outlining your professional goals and proposed research area.
  • Two confidential letters of recommendation from professors who have known the applicant and are familiar with their work.

You are strongly encouraged to contact your referee(s) prior to submitting your application in order to confirm their email address and their availability to complete your letter of recommendation.

  • Transcripts from all universities attended.
    • You must submit official transcripts from all the universities you have attended.
      This applies to all courses and programs at any university you attended, including regular programs (completed or not), exchanges, letters of permission, online or correspondence courses, courses taken as a special student or visiting student, etc.
    • If the transcript and degree certificate are not in English or French, a certified translation (signed and stamped/sealed) must be submitted.
  • The SSP registration form
    • The research supervisor’s signature confirms support of the student’s participation in the collaborative specialization in Science, Society and Policy.
  • A one-page (500 words max.) cover letter outlining the candidate’s interests in the collaborative specialization and how their research aligns with the field of study of the Institute for Science, Society and Policy.

Note: Documents that are not required for admission will not be consulted, conserved or returned to the student. These documents will be destroyed according to our administrative procedures.

Information about how to apply to this program is available under the Apply Now section.

Students should complete and submit their online application with supporting documentation (if applicable) by the deadline indicated above. The supporting documentation should be sent by e-mail attachment, regular mail, or in person.

Master’s with Collaborative Specialization

Students must meet the following requirements for the master’s with collaborative specialization. The units completed for the specialization count also towards the primary degree:

Participation in the Institute's seminar series is compulsory.  

Compulsory Courses (PHY):
9 optional course units in physics (PHY) at the graduate level 1, 29 Units
Compulsory Courses (ISP):
ISP 5101Decision at the Interface of Science and Policy3 Units
Thesis:
PHY 7999MSc Thesis 3, 4, 50 Unit

Note(s)

1

The optional course units may be selected in related disciplines approved by the Department of Physics.

2

For students accepted into the accelerated stream, the number of courses to be completed while enrolled in the MSc is reduced to two.

3

Presentation and defence of a thesis on a research topic relating to science, society and policy, carried out under the supervision of a professor who is a member of the student’s primary program and/or of the collaborative program. The Science, Society and Policy Graduate Committee will determine whether or not the topic of the thesis is appropriate for the designation of “Specialization in Science, Society and Policy.” At least one of the thesis advisory committee members and thesis examiners must be recommended by the Science, Society and Policy Graduate Committee.

4

Students are responsible for ensuring they have met all of the thesis requirements.

5

In special circumstances, the thesis may not be required. In that case, the requirements of the MSc can be met by successfully completing 10 graduate courses at the 5000 level or above as well as a comprehensive examination. Participation in the Institute’s seminar series is also required. Note that students in the accelerated stream are not eligible to complete the MSc with coursework.

Fast-Track from Master’s to PhD

Students enrolled in the master’s program in Physics at the University of Ottawa may be eligible to fast-track directly into the doctoral program without writing a master’s thesis. For additional information, please consult the “Admission Requirements” section of the PhD program. Students in the accelerated stream of the MSc are not eligible for the fast-track to the PhD.

Minimum Requirements

The passing grade in all courses is B. Students who fail two courses, or the thesis proposal, or whose research progress is deemed unsatisfactory must withdraw from the program.

Research Fields & Facilities

Located in the heart of Canada’s capital, a few steps away from Parliament Hill, the University of Ottawa is among Canada’s top 10 research universities.

uOttawa focuses research strengths and efforts in four Strategic Areas of Development in Research (SADRs):

  • Canada and the World
  • Health
  • e-Society
  • Molecular and Environmental Sciences

With cutting-edge research, our graduate students, researchers and educators strongly influence national and international priorities.

Research at the Faculty of Science

The Faculty of Science has become a true centre of excellence in research through its world-class professors as well as its programs and infrastructure in Biology, Chemistry, Earth Sciences, Mathematics and Statistics, and Physics.

The research accomplished by its 140 internationally recognized professors, its approximately 400 graduate students and its dozens of postdoctoral researchers and visiting scientists has positioned the Faculty of Science as one of the most research intensive science faculties in Canada. Our professors have received many international and national awards including three NSERC Gerhard Herzberg Gold Medal winners and numerous Fellows of the Royal Society of Canada.

The Faculty of Science, through its strategic use of infrastructure programs, hosts world-class Core Facilities and is at the leading edge for the study of Catalysis, Experimental and Computational Chemistry, Environmental Toxins, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, Isotope Analysis, Molecular Biology and Genomics, X-Ray Spectrometry/Diffractometry, Geochemistry, Mass Spectrometry, Physiology and Genetics of Aquatic Organisms, and Photonics. The Faculty is also associated with the Fields Institute for research in mathematical science and the Centre de recherche mathématiques (CRM) at the Université de Montréal, providing a unique setting for mathematical research.

For more information, refer to the list of faculty members and their research fields on Uniweb

IMPORTANT: Candidates and students looking for professors to supervise their thesis or research project can also consult the website of the faculty or department of their program of choice. Uniweb does not list all professors authorized to supervise research projects at the University of Ottawa.

Not all of the listed courses are given each year. The course is offered in the language in which it is described.
Course codes in parentheses are for Carleton University. A 3-unit course at the University of Ottawa is equivalent to a 0.5-unit course at Carleton University.

PHY 5100 Solid State Physics I (3 units)

Periodic structures. Phonons and specific heat. Electron states and various methods of energy band calculation. Cohesion of solids. Electron-electron interaction. Optical properties. This course is equivalent to PHYJ 5401 at Carleton University.

Course Component: Lecture

PHY 5110 Solid State Physics II (3 units)

Elements of group theory. Measuring the Fermi surface. One electron dynamics. k.p method. Impurities. Quantum wells. Diamagnetism, paramagnetism and magnetic ordering. Superconductivity. This course is equivalent to PHYJ 5402 at Carleton University.

Course Component: Lecture

PHY 5112 Physics of Medical Imaging (3 units)

Physical foundation of, and recent developments in, transmission x-ray imaging, computerized tomography, nuclear medicine, magnetic resonance imaging, and ultrasound, for the imaging physics specialist. Imaging system performance: contrast, resolution, modulation transfer function, signal-to-noise ratio, detective quantum efficiency. Essentials of image display and processing. This course is equivalent to PHYS 5204 at Carleton University.

Course Component: Lecture

PHY 5130 Experimental Characterization Techniques in Materials Science, Physics, Chemistry, and Mineralogy (3 units)

Survey of experimental techniques used in materials science, condensed matter physics, solid state chemistry, and mineralogy to characterize materials and solid substances. Diffraction (X-ray diffraction, neutron diffraction...). Spectroscopy (infra-red spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance, Mössbauer spectroscopy, electron spin resonance...). Microscopy and imaging (scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, optical microscopy, magnetic resonance imaging...). Other analytic techniques (thermal analysis, wet chemistry, bulk thermodynamic properties, linear response and dc susceptibility...). This course is equivalent to PHYJ 5001 at Carleton University.

Course Component: Lecture

PHY 5140 Methods in Theoretical Physics I (3 units)

This course is equivalent to PHYS 5801 at Carleton University.

Course Component: Lecture

PHY 5141 Methods in Theoretical Physics II (3 units)

This course is equivalent to PHYS 5802 at Carleton University.

Course Component: Lecture

PHY 5151 Type I and II Superconductors (3 units)

Flux flow and flux cutting phenomena. Clem general critical state model. Flux quantization, Abrikosov vortex model and Ginzburg-Landau theory. Superconducting tunnelling junctions (Giaever and Josephson types). High Tc superconductivity. This course is equivalent to PHYJ 5403 at Carleton University.

Course Component: Lecture

Prerequisite: PHY 4370

PHY 5161 Medical Radiation Physics (3 units)

This course is equivalent to PHYS 5203 at Carleton University.

Course Component: Lecture

PHY 5163 Radiation Protection (2 units)

This course is equivalent to PHYS 5208 at Carleton University.

Course Component: Lecture

PHY 5164 Medical Radiotherapy Physics (3 units)

This course is equivalent to PHYS 5206 at Carleton University.

Course Component: Lecture

PHY 5165 Radiobiology (3 units)

This course is equivalent to PHYS 5207 at Carleton University.

Course Component: Lecture

PHY 5166 Medical Physics Practicum (3 units)

This course is equivalent to PHYS 5209 at Carleton University.

Course Component: Lecture

PHY 5167 Advanced Topics in Medical Physics (3 units)

Topics may include medical imaging physics, cancer therapy physics, medical biophysics, or radiation protection and health physics. Topics vary from year to year.

Course Component: Lecture

Prerequisites: PHY 5161 plus, as appropriate to the topic offered, at least one of PHY 5112 , PHY 5164, PHY 5165.

PHY 5168 Anatomy and Physiology for Medical Physicists

Overview of human anatomy and physiology as background for the application of physics to cancer therapy and medical imaging. Anatomy as depicted by imaging technologies such as CT, MRI, and radiography will be emphasized. Graded S (Satisfactory) or NS (Not satisfactory).

Course Component: Lecture

Prerequisite: Enrolment in the graduate field of medical physics.

PHY 5170 Advanced Quantum Mechanics I (3 units)

Review of operators, motion in a general field and angular momentum. Identical particles and exchange, two electron atoms, Hartree-Fock and statistical models of many particle systems. Angular momentum, Clebsch-Gordan coefficients and scattering theory.

Course Component: Lecture

Prerequisite: PHY 4370.

PHY 5310 Advanced Optics and Photonics (3 units)

Introduction to laser physics: Optical resonators, light-matter interaction, basic operation of lasers, coherence, light control and manipulation, beam optics, Fourier optics. Guided wave optics: light propagation, allowed modes, dispersion. Courses PHY 5310, PHY 4310 cannot be combined for units. This course is equivalent to PHYJ 5310 at Carleton University.

Course Component: Lecture

PHY 5311 Quantum Optics I (3 units)

Classical and semi-classical light-matter interaction; gauges and energy conservation; two level systems in the resonant, under-resonant and over-resonant limit; time-dependent perturbation theory and Fermi's golden rule; semi-classical laser theory; Landau Zener tunnelling and multi-photon transitions; tunnel ionization and multi-photon ionization. This course is equivalent to PHYJ 5311 at Carleton University.

Course Component: Lecture

PHY 5312 Quantum Optics II (3 units)

Quantum light-matter interaction; quantization of the light field and of Schrödinger equation; number states and coherent states; photon emission and absorption; two-photon decay; photoelectric effect; Lamb shift, line-width and renormalization; Casimir effect; multi-photon processes; density operator; quantum theory of decay; quantum laser theory. This course is equivalent to PHYJ 5312 at Carleton University.

Course Component: Lecture

PHY 5318 Modern Optics (3 units)

Electromagnetic wave propagation; reflection, refraction; Gaussian beams; guided waves. Laser theory: stimulated emission, cavity optics, gain and bandwidth, atomic and molecular lasers. Mode locking, Q switching. Diffraction theory, coherence, Fourier optics, holography, laser applications. Optical communication systems, nonlinear effects: devices, fibre sensors, integrated optics.

Course Component: Lecture

PHY 5320 Introduction to the Physics of Macromolecules (3 units)

The chemistry of macromolecules and polymers; random walks and the static properties of polymers; experimental methods; the Rouse model and single chain dynamics; polymer melts and viscoelasticity; the Flory-Huggins theory; the reptation theory; computer simulation algorithms; biopolymers and copolymers. This course is equivalent to PHYJ 5508 at Carleton University.

Course Component: Lecture

PHY 5322 Biological Physics (3 units)

Biological phenomena studied using techniques of physics. Key components of cells. Physical concepts relevant to cellular phenomena: Brownian dynamics, fluids, suspensions, entropy driven phenomena, chemical forces and self-assembly. Biological molecules. Enzymes. Molecular motors. Nerve impulses. Also offered, with different requirements, as PHY 4322. Courses PHY 4322, PHY 5322 cannot be combined for units. This course is equivalent to PHYJ 5322 at Carleton University.

Course Component: Lecture

Exclusion: PHY 4322.

PHY 5330 Fiber Optics Communications (3 units)

Optical fibres: description, modes, losses. Optical transmitters: light-emitting diodes and semiconducting lasers. Optical receivers: design, noise, sensitivity, degradation, performance. System design and performance. Optical amplifiers: dispersion management, pre-compensation schemes, post-compensation techniques, dispersion compensating fibres, optical filters, fibre Bragg gratings, soliton generation, long-haul lightwave systems, high-capacity systems. Courses PHY 5330, ELG 5103 cannot be combined for units. This course is equivalent to PHYJ 5330 at Carleton University.

Course Component: Lecture

PHY 5331 Fiber Optics Sensors (3 units)

Fundamental properties of optical fibres. Light sources and detectors for optical fibre applications. Fibre optics sensors based on the Mach-Zehnder, Michelson and Fabry-Perot Interferometers, Bragg gratings. Signal detection schemes. Distributed sensing and multiplexing. Applications for optical fibre sensors. Temperature and strain measurements. This course is equivalent to PHYJ 5331 at Carleton University.

Course Component: Lecture

PHY 5332 Nonlinear Optics (3 units)

Nonlinear optical susceptibility; wave equation description of nonlinear optics processes: second harmonic generation, intensity dependent refractive index, sum- and frequency-generation, parametric amplification; quantum mechanical theory of nonlinear optics; Brillouin and Raman scattering; the electro-optic effect; nonlinear fibre optics and solitons. This course is equivalent to PHYJ 5332 at Carleton University.

Course Component: Lecture

PHY 5333 Mode Locked Lasers (3 units)

Concept and realization of mode locking. Mode locked lasers including Q-switch. Ultrafast pulse generation and measurement. Soliton generation: dispersion and self-phase modulation. Applications to science and technology. This course is equivalent to PHYJ 5333 at Carleton University.

Course Component: Lecture

PHY 5340 Computational Physics I (3 units)

Deterministic numerical methods in physics. Interpolation methods. Numerical solutions of Newton's, Maxwell's and Schrodinger's equations. Molecular dynamics. Non-linear dynamics. Numerical solutions of partial differential equations in physics. Finite elements. Courses PHY 5340, PHY 4340 cannot be combined for units. This course is equivalent to PHYJ 5004 at Carleton University.

Course Component: Lecture

PHY 5341 Computational Physics II (3 units)

Interpolation, regression and modeling. Random number generation. Monte-Carlo methods. Simulations in thermo-statistics. Fractals, percolation, cellular automata. Stochastic numerical methods. Courses PHY 5341, PHY 4341 cannot be combined for units. This course is equivalent to PHYJ 5005 at Carleton University.

Course Component: Lecture

PHY 5342 Computer Simulations in Physics (3 units)

A course aimed at exploring physics with a computer in situations where analytic methods fail. Numerical solutions of Newton's equations, non-linear dynamics. Molecular dynamics simulations. Monte-Carlo simulations in statistical physics: the Ising model, percolation, crystal growth models. Symbolic computation in classical and quantum physics. This course is equivalent to PHYJ 5003 at Carleton University.

Course Component: Lecture

Prerequisites: PHY 3355 (PHY 3755), PHY 3370 (PHY 3770) and familiarity with FORTRAN, Pascal or C.

PHY 5344 Computational Physics (3 units)

Course Component: Lecture

PHY 5347 Physics, Chemistry and Characterization of Mineral Systems (3 units)

The materials science of mineral systems such as the network and layered silicates. In-depth study of the relations between mineralogically relevant variables such as atomic structure, crystal chemistry, site populations, valence state populations, crystallization conditions, etc. Interpretation and basic understanding of key characterization tools such as microprobe analysis, Mössbauer spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction and optical spectroscopy. This course is equivalent to PHYJ 5509 at Carleton University.

Course Component: Lecture

PHY 5355 Statistical Mechanics (3 units)

Ensemble theory. Interacting classical and quantum systems. Phase transitions and critical phenomena. Fluctuations and linear response theory. Kinetic equations. This course is equivalent to PHYJ 5505 at Carleton University.

Course Component: Lecture

Prerequisites: PHY 4370 and PHY 3355.

PHY 5361 Nonlinear Dynamics in the Natural Sciences (3 units)

A multidisciplinary introduction to nonlinear dynamics with emphasis on the techniques of analysis of the dynamic behaviour of physical systems. Basic mathematical concepts underlying nonlinear dynamics, including differential and difference equations, Fourier series and data analysis, stability analysis, Poincaré maps, local bifurcations, routes to chaos and statistical properties of strange attractors. Applications of these concepts to specific problems in the natural sciences such as condensed matter physics, molecular physics, fluid mechanics, dissipative structures, evolutionary systems, etc. This course is equivalent to PHYJ 5102 at Carleton University.

Course Component: Lecture

PHY 5362 Computational Methods in Material Sciences (3 units)

Introduction to modern computational techniques used in material science research. Classical molecular dynamics, classical and quantum Monte Carlo methods, plane-wave based electronic band structure calculations, Carr-Parrinello quantum molecular dynamics. Applications to condensed matter systems: basic simulation techniques, force-field based methods in the study of thermodynamic and physical properties of solids, first-principles quantum mechanical methods. This course is equivalent to PHYJ 5006 at Carleton University.

Course Component: Lecture

PHY 5380 Semiconductor Physics I (3 units)

Brillouin zones and band theory. E-k diagram, effective mass tensors, etc. Electrical properties of semiconductors. This course is equivalent to PHYJ 5407 at Carleton University.

Course Component: Lecture

PHY 5381 Semiconductor Physics II: Optical Properties (3 units)

Optical constants and dispersion theory. Optical absorption, reflection, and band structure. Absorption at band edge and excitons. Lattice, defect and free-carrier absorption. Magneto-optics. Photo-electronic properties, luminescence, detector theory. Experimental methods.

Course Component: Lecture

Prerequisite: PHY 4380 or equivalent

PHY 5384 Physics of Fiber Optic Systems (3 units)

Physics of electromagnetic waves in fiber-optic systems. Laser madulation, chirp effects, noise. Amplitude, frequency and phase modulation. Optical dispersion (chromatic dispersion, polarization mode dispersion and polarization-dependent losses). Fiber losses and non-linear effects. Optical detectors, receivers, signal to noise ratio, power penalties. Overall system design. This course is equivalent to PHYJ 5308 at Carleton University.

Course Component: Lecture

PHY 5387 Physics of Materials (3 units)

Microscopic characteristics related to the physical properties of materials. Materials families: metals and alloys, ceramics, polymers and plastics, composites, layered materials, ionic solids, molecular solids, etc. Specific materials groups. Equilibrium phase diagrams and their relation to microstructure and kinetics. Experimental methods of characterization. Interactions and reactions. This course is equivalent to PHYJ 5504 at Carleton University.

Course Component: Lecture

Prerequisite: PHY 4382 or equivalent. Cannot be combined for credit with PHY 4387.

PHY 5495 Physics in Modern Technology Work Term

Practical experience for students in the physics in modern technology stream. Graded S (Satisfactory) or NS (Not satisfactory), to be based on the grades obtained for the written and oral reports as well as on the evaluations of the employer. This course is equivalent to PHYS 5905 at Carleton University.

Volet : Stage

PHY 5722 Physique biologique (3 crédits)

Application des méthodes de la physique à l'étude des phénomènes biologiques. Composantes principales d'une cellule. Concepts physiques pertinents aux phénomènes cellulaires : dynamique brownienne, liquides, suspensions, phénomènes d'origine entropique, forces chimiques et auto-assemblage. Molécules biologiques. Enzymes. Moteurs moléculaires. Impulsions nerveuses. Offert également, avec des exigences différentes, sous la cote PHY 4722. Les cours PHY 4722, PHY 5722 ne peuvent être combinés pour l'obtention de crédits. Ce cours est équivalent à PHYJ 5722 à la Carleton University.

Volet : Cours magistral

Exclusion: PHY 4322.

PHY 5740 Physique numérique I (3 crédits)

Méthodes numériques déterministes en physique. Techniques d'interpolation. Solutions numériques des équations de Newton, de Maxwell et de Schrödinger. Dynamique moléculaire. Dynamique non-linéaire. Solutions numériques des équations aux dérivées partielles en physique. Éléments finis. Les cours PHY 5740, PHY 4740 ne peuvent être combinés pour l'obtention de crédits. Ce cours est équivalent à PHYJ 5502 à la Carleton University.

Volet : Cours magistral

PHY 5741 Physique numérique II (3 crédits)

Interpolations, régression et modélisation de données. Nombres aléatoires. Techniques de Monte-Carlo. Simulations thermo-statistiques. Percolation, fractales et automates cellulaires. Méthodes numériques stochastiques. Les cours PHY 5741, PHY 4741 ne peuvent être combinés pour l'obtention de crédits. Ce cours est équivalent à PHYJ 5503 à la Carleton University.

Volet : Cours magistral

PHY 5742 Simulations numériques en physique (3 crédits)

Un cours ayant pour but d'étudier la physique à l'aide d'un ordinateur dans des situations où les méthodes analytiques sont inadéquates. Solutions numériques des équations de Newton. Dynamique non-linéaire. Simulations de dynamique moléculaire. Simulations Monte-Carlo en physique statistique : modèle d'Ising, percolation, croissance cristalline. Calcul symbolique en physique classique et quantique. Les cours PHY 5742, PHY 5344 ne peuvent être combinés pour l'obtention de crédits. Ce cours est équivalent à PHYJ 5506 à la Carleton University.

Volet : Cours magistral

Prerequisites: PHY 3355 (PHY 3755), PHY 3370 (PHY 3770) and familiarity with FORTRAN, Pascal or C.

PHY 5781 Physique des semi-conducteurs II : Propriétés optiques (3 crédits)

Constantes optiques et théorie de la dispersion. Absorption optique, réflexion et structure de bandes. Seuil d'absorption et excitons. Absorption due au réseau, aux défauts et aux porteurs libres. Magnéto-optique. Propriétés photo-électroniques, luminescence, théorie des détecteurs. Méthodes expérimentales.

Volet : Cours magistral

PHY 5895 Stage en physique de la technologie moderne

Expérience pratique pour les étudiants dans l'option physique de la technologie moderne. Noté S (satisfaisant) ou NS (non satisfaisant), basée sur l'évaluation de l'employeur et les rapports écrits et oraux décrivant le projet du stage.

Volet : Cours magistral

Préalable : Être accepté dans l'option physique de la technologie moderne du programme de maîtrise et permission du département.

PHY 5922 Advanced Magnetism (3 crédits / 3 units)

Study of some of the experimental and theoretical aspects of magnetic phenomena found in ferro-, ferri-, antiferro-magnetic and spin glass materials. Topics of current interest in magnetism. Ce cours est équivalent à PHYJ 5507 à la Carleton University. This course is equivalent to PHYJ 5507 at Carleton University.

Volet / Course Component: Cours magistral / Lecture

Prerequisite: PHY 4385 or equivalent.

PHY 5951 Physique de basses températures / Low Temperature Physics II (3 crédits / 3 units)

Properties of matter at low temperatures. Helium Physics. Thermometry at Low Temperatures. Theory and Technology of Cryogenics Refrigerators. Applied Superconductivity. Recent developments: Cryoelectronic, Quantum Hall Effect. Helium Crystal Growth, Nuclear Magnetic Ordering, Cryogenic Detectors and Polarised Target for High Energy Physics. Ce cours est équivalent à PHYJ 5409 à la Carleton University. / This course is equivalent to PHYJ 5409 at Carleton University.

Volet / Course Component: Cours magistral / Lecture

Prerequisite: PHY 3355 or PHY 3755

PHY 5966 Experimental Techniques of Nuclear and Elementary Particle Physics (3 crédits / 3 units)

A course intended for students interested in high energy experimental physics. Large accelerators for charged particles. Particle detectors: nuclear emulsion, bubble chamber, spark chamber, Vertex detectors and calorimeters etc. Study of properties of elementary particles through analysis of experimental results. Ce cours est équivalent à PHYJ 5601 à la Carleton University. / This course is equivalent to PHYJ 5601 at Carleton University.

Volet / Course Component: Cours magistral / Lecture

Prerequisite: PHY 4360

PHY 5967 Physique des particules / Elementary Particle Physics (3 crédits / 3 units)

Ce cours est équivalent à PHYS 5602 à la Carleton University. / This course is equivalent to PHYS 5602 at Carleton University.

Volet / Course Component: Cours magistral / Lecture

PHY 6170 Advanced Quantum Mechanics II (3 units)

Systems of identical particles and many-body theory. Lattice and impurity scattering. Quantum processes in a magnetic field. Radiative and non-radiative transitions. Introduction to relativisitic quantum mechanics. This course is equivalent to PHYJ 5703 at Carleton University.

Course Component: Lecture

Prerequisite: PHY 5170.

PHY 6371 Topics in Mossbauer Spectroscopy (3 units)

Experimental techniques used to measure Mössbauer spectra. Physics of the Mössbauer effect: recoilless emission/absorption, anisotropic Debye-Waller factors, second order Doppler shifts, etc. Mössbauer lineshape theory with static and dynamic hyperfine interactions. Distributions of static hyperfine parameters. Physics of the hyperfine parameters: origin of the hyperfine field, transferred and supertransferred fields, calculations of electric field gradients, etc. Applications of Mössbauer spectroscopy to various areas of solid state physics and materials science. This course is equivalent to PHYJ 5404 at Carleton University.

Course Component: Lecture

PHY 6382 Physics of Semiconductor Super Lattices (3 units)

Fundamental physics of two-dimensional quantized semiconductor structures. Electronic and optical properties of superlattices and quantum wells. Optical and electronic applications. This course is intented for students registered for the Ph.D. in semconductor physics research. This course is equivalent to PHYJ 6406 at Carleton University.

Course Component: Lecture

Prerequisite: Advanced undergraduate or graduate course in solid state physics.

PHY 6650 Supraconductivité II (2 crédits)

Volet : Cours magistral

PHY 6782 Physique des super-réseaux à semiconducteurs (3 crédits)

Physique fondamentale des structures quantiques bi-dimensionnelles à semiconducteurs. Propriétés électroniques et optiques des super-réseaux et puits quantiques. Applications à l'électronique et à l'optique. Ce cours est destiné aux étudiantes et aux étudiants inscrits au doctorat en physique des semiconducteurs. Ce cours est équivalent à PHYJ 6407 à la Carleton University.

Volet : Cours magistral

Préalable : Cours sénior ou de niveau supérieur en physique de l'état solide.

PHY 7999 Thèse de maîtrise / MSc Thesis

Ce cours est équivalent à PHYS 5909 à la Carleton University. / This course is equivalent to PHYS 5909 at Carleton University.

Volet / Course Component: Recherche / Research

PHY 8111 Classical Mechanics and Theory of Field (3 units)

This course is equivalent to PHYS 5101 at Carleton University.

Course Component: Lecture

PHY 8122 Molecular Spectroscopy (3 units)

This course is equivalent to PHYS 5202 at Carleton University.

Course Component: Lecture

PHY 8132 Classical Electrodynamics (3 units)

This course is equivalent to PHYS 5302 at Carleton University.

Course Component: Lecture

PHY 8164 Intermediate Nuclear Physics (3 units)

This course is equivalent to PHYS 5604 at Carleton University.

Course Component: Lecture

PHY 8165 Particle Physics Phenomenology (3 units)

This course is equivalent to PHYS 6601 at Carleton University.

Course Component: Lecture

PHY 8166 Advanced Topics in Particle Physics Phenomenology (3 units)

This course is equivalent to PHYS 6602 at Carleton University.

Course Component: Lecture

PHY 8172 Relativistic Quantum Mechanics (3 units)

This course is equivalent to PHYS 5702 at Carleton University.

Course Component: Lecture

PHY 8173 Quantum Electrodynamics (3 units)

This course is equivalent to PHYS 6701 at Carleton University.

Course Component: Lecture

PHY 8191 Selected Topics in Physics (3 units)

This course is equivalent to PHYS 5901 at Carleton University.

Course Component: Lecture

PHY 8260 Advanced Nuclear Physics (6 units)

Course Component: Lecture

PHY 8290 Selected Topics in Physics (MSc) (6 units)

This course is equivalent to PHYS 5900 at Carleton University.

Course Component: Lecture

PHY 8391 Selected Topics in Physics (PhD) (3 units)

This course is equivalent to PHYS 6901 at Carleton University.

Course Component: Lecture

PHY 8490 Selected Topics in Physics (PhD) (6 crédits)

This course is equivalent to PHYS 6900 at Carleton University.

Volet : Cours magistral

PHY 9998 Examen de synthèse (Doctorat) / Comprehensive Examination (PhD)

Volet / Course Component: Recherche / Research

PHY 9999 PhD Thesis / PhD Thesis

Ce cours est équivalent à PHYS 6909 à la Carleton University. / This course is equivalent to PHYS 6909 at Carleton University.

Volet / Course Component: Recherche / Research

ISP 5101 Decision at the Interface of Science and Policy (3 units)

This course explores a number of critical issues in the design and implementation of science (or, more generally, evidence)-based policy. Topics will include: the nature of scientific evidence; who has standing in the provisioning of scientific evidence; the science and non-science of risk assessment; ethical dimensions of policy design and implementation; the role of science in policy design and implementation; the policy making process; and science policy performance evaluation.

Course Component: Lecture

ISP 5102 Science andTechnology Governance and Communication (3 units)

This course explores a number of critical issues in the governance of science and technology (S&T) in democratic societies, with particular emphasis on the Canadian context. Topics will include the following: the history of S&T governance and communication in both Canada and abroad; an overview of the Canadian S&T policy and regulatory landscape; the role of government, the private sector and civil society in S&T governance; policy and regulatory experiments in fostering innovation (and the success thereof); the evolution of public S&T communication strategies and governance of emerging technologies.

Course Component: Lecture

ISP 5103 Capstone Seminar in Science, Society and Policy (3 units)

Involves partnering with organization(s) working on an issue relating to science, society and policy. In consultation with a member of the organization, students analyze the issue and complete a written report, either singly or in interdisciplinary teams, under the direction of the seminar professor who is responsible for evaluating the report.

Course Component: Lecture

ISP 5501 Prise de décision à l'interface de la science et des politiques (3 crédits)

Ce cours approfondit un certain nombre d'enjeux critiques liés à la conception et à la mise en oeuvre de politiques scientifiques (ou, de façon plus générale, fondées sur des preuves). Les sujets abordés incluent les suivants : la nature de la preuve scientifique; qui a qualité pour fournir des preuves scientifiques; le côté scientifique et le côté non scientifique de l'évaluation des risques; les dimensions éthiques de la conception et de la mise en oeuvre des politiques publiques; le rôle de la science dans la conception et la mise en oeuvre des politiques publiques; le processus d'élaboration des politiques publiques; et l'évaluation du rendement des politiques publiques en matière de sciences.

Volet : Cours magistral

ISP 5502 Gouvernance et communication en science et technologie (3 crédits)

Ce cours approfondit un certain nombre d'enjeux critiques liés à la gouvernance des sciences et de la technologie (S et T) dans les sociétés démocratiques et, en particulier, dans le contexte canadien. Les sujets abordés incluent les suivants : l'histoire de la gouvernance et de la communication en sciences et technologie au Canada et à l'étranger; un aperçu du paysage réglementaire et politique canadien ayant trait aux sciences et à la technologie; le rôle du gouvernement, du secteur privé et de la société civile dans la gouvernance des sciences et de la technologie; les expériences relatives aux politiques et à la réglementation menées en vue de favoriser l'innovation (et leur réussite); l'évolution des stratégies de communication publique concernant les sciences et la technologie et la gouvernance des nouvelles technologies.

Volet : Cours magistral

ISP 5503 Séminaire d'intégration en science, société et politique publique (3 crédits)

Involves partnering with organization(s) working on an issue relating to science, society and policy. In consultation with a member of the organization, students analyze the issue and complete a written report, either singly or in interdisciplinary teams, under the direction of the seminar professor who is responsible for evaluating the report.

Volet : Cours magistral