(This program is offered in English only.)

The Department of English offers the degrees of Master of Arts (with or without thesis) and Doctor of Philosophy in English. Both programs equip students to pursue advanced studies in British, Canadian, or American literature informed by a broad knowledge of literary history and by recent developments in literary criticism and cultural theory. The department is well known for its annual Canadian Literature Symposium, and its faculty is distinguished and well-published. The Ontario Council on Graduate Studies (OCGS) has consistently awarded the department the council's highest rating.

The department participates in the collaborative programs in Women's Studies and in Medieval and Renaissance Studies at the master's level, and in the collaborative program in Canadian Studies at the PhD level. For more information on these programs, see “Program Requirements”.

The collaborative master’s in Medieval and Renaissance Studies (MDR) has two goals:

  • To offer at the graduate level a multi-disciplinary education in Medieval and Renaissance Studies;
  • To teach students the theoretical approaches and methods of research specific to the study of the period.

Since the 16th century, study of the middle ages implies studying a ‘middle’, or intermediary period, seen as standing between two great civilizations: Roman antiquity and the modern western world. This definition has had a major impact on scholarship, crystallizing a periodization that has now become traditional in most of the humanities.

The programs are governed by the general regulations in effect for graduate studies. Please note, however, that any course fulfilling a graduate degree requirement in English must be completed with a mark of B or higher. A student whose record shows any two grades lower than a mark of B will automatically be withdrawn from the program. Most graduate courses in the Department of English at the University of Ottawa carry three units. Requirements are stated in number of units.

For the most accurate and up to date information on application deadlines, language tests and other admission requirements, please visit the specific requirements webpage.

  • The MA program is intended to refine the critical and scholarly skills of high-achieving graduates from undergraduate honours programs. An honours BA in English literature with a minimum high second class standing of B+ is normally required. A 500-word statement of interest in the program is required with the application. Students applying for the MA with thesis option should submit a sample of their academic writing, such as an essay written for an undergraduate English course.
  • Students who have completed a BA or equivalent degree with a minimum of six full courses in English with an average of 75 per cent (B+) may be admitted to a qualifying year which normally comprises 30 units selected to ensure coverage of the major fields of English literature. These courses must be successfully completed in each case with a mark of B+ or higher. By special permission one or two graduate courses may be substituted for the equivalent number of undergraduate courses. After the requirements of the qualifying year have been satisfactorily fulfilled, students may apply for admission to the regular MA program. Such admission will depend on the quality of their overall record.

Collaborative Programs

The Department of English is a participating unit in the collaborative programs in Women's Studies (master's level only) and in Medieval and Renaissance Studies (master's level only). Students should indicate in their initial application for admission to the master's program in English that they wish to be accepted into one of the collaborative programs. 

Students who wish to enroll in the collaborative program in Medieval and Renaissance Studies must first be admitted to a master’s program in one of the participating units. Candidates must hold an honours degree or the equivalent.

The courses offered by the collaborative program in Medieval and Renaissance Studies are offered in English, in French, and in a bilingual format. An excellent knowledge of English or French and a passive understanding of the other language are required. Each academic unit maintains its own language requirements. Except in the case of students in the departments of English and Français, all students have the right to submit assignments, the major research paper, or the thesis, and to answer examination questions in the official language of their choice.

The Department offers three options for the MA:

  • A two-year program in which students complete fifteen units of course work, including ENG 6302 and ENG 6303, as well as a thesis proposal (ENG 7997), and a thesis (ENG 7999) of about ninety pages in length defended in an oral examination.
  • A one-year program in which students complete eighteen units of course work, including ENG 6302 and ENG 6303, as well as a research paper (ENG 6999) of about 12,000 words.
  • A one-year program in which students complete twenty-seven units of course work, including ENG 6302 and ENG 6303.

The completion times above are for the full-time students. Part-time students may take up to four years to complete either MA program, but are not eligible for scholarship support. The residence requirement for students admitted on a full-time basis is three terms.

In keeping with the bilingual character of the University, the program has a French language requirement. Student may satisfy this requirement by passing FLS 1000, the test administered by the Official Languages and Bilingualism Institute, or its equivalent as determined by the Department of English. A pass on the Department's test leads to an S on the transcript. Students may also satisfy the language requirement by passing six units of second-year university-level language course(s). These courses are additional to the English courses required for the degree.

Collaborative Program in Medieval and Renaissance Studies

Students in the program must complete the requirements of their primary program and those of the collaborative program. The course MDV 5100 (3 units) in Medieval and Renaissance Studies will be counted towards the requirements of the primary program. Consequently, students in the specialization will have only one extra course to take.

The requirements of the collaborative program are as follows:

Compulsory Courses: 1
MDV 5100Medieval and Renaissance Studies Research Methods and Tools3 Units
MDV 5900Interdisciplinary Research Seminar3 Units
Thesis or Major Research Paper 2

Note(s)

1

Students must complete the two compulsory courses before they enroll to the major research paper or thesis.

2

A thesis or major research paper on a topic related to medieval and Renaissance studies; the proposed topic must be approved by the program committee of the participating unit and the committee of the collaborative program. The supervision of the major research paper or thesis must be carried out by a professor approved by the collaborative program committee. At least one of the two thesis examiners (or one examiner of the major research paper) must be a member of the collaborative program. In both cases, the title of the degree will indicate the discipline of the participating unit with the specification "specialization in Medieval and Renaissance Studies."

Duration of Program

Students are expected to complete all requirements within two years. The thesis must be submitted within four years of the date of initial enrollment in the program.

Minimum Standards

The passing grade in all courses is B. Students who fail two courses (equivalent to 6 units) must withdraw from the program.

Research Fields & Facilities

Located in the heart of Canada’s capital, a few steps away from Parliament Hill, the University of Ottawa is among Canada’s top 10 research universities.

uOttawa focuses research strengths and efforts in four Strategic Areas of Development in Research (SADRs):

  • Canada and the World
  • Health
  • e-Society
  • Molecular and Environmental Sciences

With cutting-edge research, our graduate students, researchers and educators strongly influence national and international priorities.

Research at the Faculty of Arts

The Faculty of Arts is proud of the state of the art research conducted by its professors. In the spirit of showcasing its research to the university community as well as to the general public, the Faculty has created three activities: Dean's Lecture Series, Treasures of the Library, and Excellence Lectures.

Facilities, Research Centres and Institutes at the Faculty of Arts

Centre de recherche en civilisation canadienne-française, Institute of Canadian and Aboriginal Studies, Institute for Science, Society and Policy, Official Languages and Bilingualism Institute (OLBI) and Morisset Library.

For more information, refer to the list of faculty members and their research fields on Uniweb

IMPORTANT: Candidates and students looking for professors to supervise their thesis or research project can also consult the website of the faculty or department of their program of choice. Uniweb does not list all professors authorized to supervise research projects at the University of Ottawa.

ENG 6111 Directed Readings I (3 units)

Course Component: Research

ENG 6112 Directed Readings II (3 units)

Course Component: Research

ENG 6300 Old English I (3 units)

Course Component: Seminar

ENG 6301 Old English II (3 units)

Course Component: Seminar

ENG 6302 Research Methodology (1.5 units)

Preparation of students for the professional study of English and for the application of graduate level research skills to non-academic careers. Review and analysis of electronic and print research tools and methods. Internet database searches, both in the discipline of English as well as in related fields (such as history, philosophy, and sociology), and evaluation of Internet sites. Short assignments developing skills in academic and non-academic research. Preparation of grant applications and of the thesis proposal (for students in the MA with thesis program). Graded S (Satisfactory) / NS (Not satisfactory). Offered in the fall session.

Course Component: Seminar

ENG 6303 Professional Development (1.5 units)

Preparation of students for careers involving graduate level research and communication skills, including teaching, university research, and non-academic careers. Introduction to academic and non-academic professional activities: writing and publishing scholarly articles, and research reports, disseminating research results through academic and non-academic presentations, networking, participation in conferences and professional associations, and career planning for both academic and non-academic career paths for holders of graduate degrees. Sessions to be devoted to the practice of teaching, covering such topics as syllabus construction, teaching 'styles,' classroom management, teaching dossiers, student evaluation, and the application of teaching skills to non-academic goals such as presentations and team-building. Graded S (Satisfactory) / NS (Not satisfactory). Offered in the winter session.

Course Component: Seminar

ENG 6304 Doctoral Research Methods (3 units)

Overview of theoretical, methodological, and critical approaches to literary studies to enable students to situate their own research within the discipline.

Course Component: Seminar

ENG 6310 Middle English Literature I (3 units)

Course Component: Seminar

ENG 6313 Directed Reading (3 units)

Course Component: Research

ENG 6320 Middle English Literature (3 units)

Course Component: Seminar

ENG 6321 Middle English Literature III (3 units)

Course Component: Seminar

ENG 6322 Middle English Literature IV (3 units)

Course Component: Seminar

ENG 6330 Renaissance Literature I (3 units)

Course Component: Seminar

ENG 6341 Shakespeare I (3 units)

Course Component: Seminar

ENG 6342 Shakespeare II (3 units)

Course Component: Seminar

ENG 6343 Shakespeare III (3 units)

Course Component: Seminar

ENG 6344 Shakespeare IV (3 units)

Course Component: Seminar

ENG 6350 Renaissance Literature II (3 units)

Course Component: Seminar

ENG 6351 Renaissance Literature III (3 units)

Course Component: Seminar

ENG 6352 Renaissance Literature IV (3 units)

Course Component: Seminar

ENG 6355 Restoration Literature (3 units)

Course Component: Seminar

ENG 6356 Restoration Literature II (3 units)

Course Component: Seminar

ENG 6357 Restoration Literature III (3 units)

Course Component: Seminar

ENG 6360 Eighteenth Century Literature I (3 units)

Course Component: Seminar

ENG 6361 Eighteenth Century Literature II (3 units)

Course Component: Seminar

ENG 6362 Eighteenth-Century Literature III (3 units)

Course Component: Seminar

ENG 6363 Eighteenth-Century Literature IV (3 units)

Course Component: Seminar

ENG 6370 Romantic Literature I (3 units)

Course Component: Seminar

ENG 6371 Romantic Literature II (3 units)

Course Component: Seminar

ENG 6372 Romantic Literature III (3 units)

Course Component: Seminar

ENG 6373 Romantic Literature IV (3 units)

Course Component: Seminar

ENG 6380 Victorian Literature I (3 units)

Course Component: Lecture

ENG 6381 Victorian Literature II (3 units)

Course Component: Seminar

ENG 6382 Victorian Literature III (3 units)

Course Component: Seminar

ENG 6383 Victorian Literature IV (3 units)

Course Component: Seminar

ENG 6900 Second Language Requirement

In keeping with the bilingual character of the University, the MA program has a French language requirement. Students may satisfy this requirement by passing the FLS 1000, the test administered by the Official Languages and Bilingualism Institute, or the departmental language test. The departmental tests are one-hour examinations which require the candidate to translate, with the aid of a dictionary, a passage of literary criticism or another appropriate selection of similar difficulty approximately one page in length. Students may also satisfy the language requirement by passing six units of second-year university-level language course(s). These courses are additional to the English courses required for the degree. In all cases, the minimum passing grade is 50% and leads to an S (Satisfactory) on the transcript for ENG 6900.

Volet / Course Component: Recherche / Research

ENG 6999 Major Research Paper

The research paper is prepared under the direction of the research paper supervisor and is approved by the graduate committee. The research paper must be successfully completed by the end of the third session of full-time registration in the master's program. In the event of failure, the student must register for an additional session. A second failure leads to a grade of NS (Not satisfactory) on the transcript and to withdrawal from the program.

Volet / Course Component: Recherche / Research

Prerequisites: 15 credits at the 5000, 6000, 7000 or 8000 level

ENG 7300 Modern Literature I (3 units)

Course Component: Seminar

ENG 7301 Modern Literature II (3 units)

Course Component: Seminar

ENG 7302 Modern Literature III (3 units)

Course Component: Seminar

ENG 7303 Modern Literature IV (3 units)

Course Component: Seminar

ENG 7310 American Literature I (3 units)

Course Component: Seminar

ENG 7311 American Literature II (3 units)

Course Component: Seminar

ENG 7312 American Literature III (3 units)

Course Component: Seminar

ENG 7313 American Literature IV (3 units)

Course Component: Seminar

ENG 7320 Canadian Literature I (3 units)

Course Component: Seminar

ENG 7321 Canadian Literature II (3 units)

Course Component: Seminar

ENG 7322 Canadian Literature III (3 units)

Course Component: Seminar

ENG 7323 Canadian Literature IV (3 units)

Course Component: Seminar

ENG 7330 Anglo Irish Literature (3 units)

Course Component: Seminar

ENG 7331 Anglo-Irish Literature II (3 units)

Course Component: Seminar

ENG 7332 Anglo-Irish Literature III (3 units)

Course Component: Seminar

ENG 7370 History of the English Language (3 units)

Course Component: Seminar

ENG 7375 Commonwealth Literature (3 units)

Course Component: Seminar

ENG 7376 Commonwealth Literature II (3 units)

Course Component: Seminar

ENG 7377 Commonwealth Literature III (3 units)

Course Component: Seminar

ENG 7380 History of Criticism (3 units)

Course Component: Seminar

ENG 7381 Theory of Criticism (3 units)

Course Component: Seminar

ENG 7382 History of Criticism II (3 units)

Course Component: Seminar

ENG 7383 History of Criticism III (3 units)

Course Component: Seminar

ENG 7384 Theory of Criticism II (3 units)

Course Component: Seminar

ENG 7385 Theory of Criticism III (3 units)

Course Component: Seminar

ENG 7900 Second Language Requirement

In keeping with the bilingual character of the University, the PhD program has a French language requirement. Students may satisfy this requirement by passing FLS 1000, the test administered by the Official Languages and Bilingualism Institute, or the departmental language test. The departmental tests are one-hour examinations which require the candidate to translate, with the aid of a dictionary, a passage of literary criticism or another appropriate selection of similar difficulty approximately one page in length. Language testing of languages other than French is normally administered by the Department. Students may also satisfy the language requirement by passing six units of second-year university-level language course(s). These courses are additional to the 18 units required for the degree. In all cases, the minimum passing grade is 66% and leads to an S (Satisfactory) on the transcript for ENG 7900. NOTE: Students who achieve 65% or higher at the MA level will not be required to retake the test if they continue on to the PhD.

Volet / Course Component: Recherche / Research

ENG 7997 M. Thesis Proposal

The thesis proposal is prepared under the direction of the thesis supervisor and is approved by the graduate committee. The proposal must normally be successfully completed by the end of the third session. In the event of failure, the proposal can be resubmitted the following session at the latest. A second failure leads to a grade of NS on the transcript and to withdrawal from the program. Graded S (Satisfactory) / NS (Not satisfactory).

Volet / Course Component: Recherche / Research

Prerequisites: 7.5 credits.

ENG 7999 M.A. Thesis Research

Volet / Course Component: Recherche / Research

ENG 9997 Ph.D. Thesis Proposal

The thesis proposal is prepared under the direction of the thesis supervisor and is approved by the graduate committee after consultation with area experts. The proposal must normally be successfully completed by the end of the seventh session. In the event of failure, the proposal can be resubmitted the following session at the latest. A second failure leads to a grade of NS on the transcript and to withdrawal from the program. Graded S (Satisfactory) / NS (Not satisfactory).

Volet / Course Component: Recherche / Research

Préalable : 15 crédits. / Prerequisites: 15 units.

ENG 9998 Comprehensive Exam (Ph.D.)

Volet / Course Component: Recherche / Research

ENG 9999 Ph.D. Thesis Research

Volet / Course Component: Recherche / Research

MDV 5100 Medieval and Renaissance Studies Research Methods and Tools (3 units)

Approaches to the study of manuscripts (paleography, codicology, iconography) and texts (explication, diplomatics, liturgy, stemmata) of the period.

Course Component: Seminar

MDV 5500 Méthodes et outils de recherche des études médiévales et de la Renaissance (3 crédits)

Approches à l'étude de manuscrits (paléographie, codicologie, iconographie) et textes (explication des textes, diplomatique, liturgie, stemmata) de l'époque.

Volet : Cours magistral

MDV 5900 Séminaire de recherche interdisciplinaire / Interdisciplinary Research Seminar (3 crédits / 3 units)

Séminaire bilingue à thèmes variables destiné à explorer le sens et la valeur du travail interdisciplinaire en études médiévales et modernes. / Bilingual seminar using varying themes as a vehicle for exploring the meaning and value of interdisciplinary work in medieval and modern studies.

Volet / Course Component: Séminaire / Seminar